• Past Articles

The Karma of Recovery – By William L. White

  The concept of karma holds that one’s fate in this life or future lives is not a random roll of the dice, but a direct product of one’s thoughts and actions. Rooted in many of the great religions and a central motif within Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, karma is mistakenly confused in popular culture with the idea of good or bad luck. In contrast, karma suggests the presence of a universal principle of justice–that the decisions one makes or the actions one takes or fails to take have inevitable consequences. This principle can be found in many popular aphorisms: You reap what you sow. Violence begets violence. They that sow the wind shall reap the whirlwind. What goes around comes around.     Chickens come home to roost.  You get what you give.  Those who live by the sword die by the sword. The principle of karma poses an interesting dilemma for people… Continue reading

Why you may wish to disconnect to reconnect; technology addiction is real! – Jeanne Foot

  Twice in this past week, I have seen two social media giants; Apple and Facebook publicly admit with data, showing the severity of their concerns, as to how clearly your smartphone is making you antisocial, unhealthy and that their technology is designed to hook people using the same neural pathways as gambling and drugs. In fact, both Chris Marcellino who was one of the developers behind the iPhone’s “push notifications” as well as Sean Parker, Ex-President to Facebook, recently admitted that the world-bestriding social media platform, was designed to hook users with spurts of dopamine, a complicated neurotransmitter being released when the brain expects a reward or receives fresh information. ‘You’re exploiting a vulnerability in human psychology” states Sean Parker. In other words, we live in times when the “norm” for the average user is to look at their iPhone a minimum of 150 times daily, even though they… Continue reading

Meeting People Where They Are At – By Kyczy Hawk

A time of reflection. A time to cast the mind forward and the glance backward. A time to reset my intentions and to consider where my intentions have fallen by the wayside. How have my actions missed the mark? I am good with the practical, with the mundane, even with the technical. But relationships… they can trip me up. I am a recovering codependent. I have a weakness for otheration. When slightly stressed, when emotions run high, when my tank runs empty I fall into bad habits. I even fall into the habit of thought that “I should be better than this, I should be better by now, I should, I should, I should.” I am even codependent with my expectations of myself. (More on this later.) I have some tools to use when I am in a difficult relationship. These relationship difficulties can arise due to my own shortcomings,… Continue reading

Addiction from a Friends Point of View

  I didn’t realize it at first, but I’m sure it was there. After countless days of coming home to them passed out on the couch, after so many bright mornings lost to drunken tirades, after so many little moments turn into major splinters, you slowly see what has been creeping in that dark space for what it is: the feeling of powerlessness. I felt it when I called her thirty times after midnight. Her last text expressed a desire for relief through suicide. I felt it every time I spoke with them and the person I loved was lost from their face, their voice, their movements. I saw it in my friend when their father demanded respect but dealt disrespect — lying to their family, lying to family friends, lying to himself. Every lie he told was just one more brick in the wall, a wall being built around… Continue reading

Working on Ourselves and Our Relationships in the New Year – By Jackie Stein

  As we begin 2018, many of us seek to engage in new and healthy behaviors.  We plan to eat better and sleep better.  We plan to give up cigarettes or video games.  We also say we want to repair our relationships with our family members who are suffering from substance use disorders (SUDs). We know how to eat better and sleep better – we give up foods that are unhealthy and we drink lots of water.  We stop drinking caffeine in the evening and turn off our electronics at least an hour before bedtime.  We have tools for giving up cigarettes, unhealthy eating and video games, including medications and 12 step programs. Similarly, there are tools to aid and support us as we try to develop a healthy program for living with our loved ones.  That program involves tools and programs to both help our loved ones and repair… Continue reading